Tag Archive: new music


I first heard of Nubiyan Twist when I went to see Joe Armon-Jones at The Crescent in York last November, as Joe introduced the band he got to bassist Luke Wynter he said he was in Nubiyan Twist from Leeds. My first thought was that’s a great name for a band and that there was another potentially great band coming out of Leeds. It turns out I was right this is another great band coming out of Leeds (though now based in London) and what’s more another great band that met and formed at Leeds College of Music. Leeds College of Music is a respected music education institution in the UK but if it keeps on producing the amount of quality bands it is currently it will become world famous and rank alongside the likes of Berklee in the USA.

But I got off the point for a while there It’s time to get back to talking about the music of Nubiyan Twist and their album “Jungle Run”. On the bands Facebook page under Band Interests it says “To encourage artistic and social unity between different cultures and musical styles.” This is definitely a mission statement the band achieves on this album, they combine the disparate styles of dance music (including House and Drum ‘n’ Bass), Dub, Latin, Afrobeat, Ethio-Jazz, Hip-Hop, Turntablism and Soul into a potent stew of sound. This is quite an achievement considering the band has ten members And also joined in this album by guests Nubiya Brandon (vocals), Tony Allen (drums) the inventor of the rhythms of Afrobeat and Mulatu Astatke (vibraphone) the inventor of Ethio-Jazz. I have to admit that I am very jealous of the fact that the band gets to work with two giants of African music. Another achievement is to not be subsumed by those legends on the track states they contribute to this is a band with a clear identity and incredible musical talent to boot. Bandleader Tom Excell also produced the record in the bands own studio in Oxfordshire in the UK and it’s an impressive feat to say the least to build to get all these competing instruments and talents to play nicely in a mix. This isn’t just an impressive album it’s a lot of fun to the irresistible beats make impossible for you not to dance and the catchy choruses will be in your head in no time.

I know I’m probably repeating myself here but it’s hard to overstate how incredible this album is not only as a musical achievement but something that truly represents what music can be in the 21st-century. This is an album of the Internet age don’t get me wrong there are albums made fused cells are music together before the Internet age but “Jungle Run” is something only truly achievable in a world where you can access any music at any time with the click of a button. This is a real Album of the Year contender and definitely check it out.

Let me know what you think of “Jungle Run” in the Comments.

This is Part One in a series of posts rounding up my favourite releases of the last three months and writing about them. Part Two will be published next Saturday.

Yak – “Pursuit of Momentary Happiness”

An early contender for Album of the Year comes from this English psychedelic rock band. Yak don’t just recycle the psychedelic (colour projector) wheel this is an album of well produced punchy and catchy songs that don’t out stay there welcome while still having the depth of albums with much longer cuts. Even when they do go long such as on album closer ‘This House Has No Living Room’ (which features J.Spaceman aka Jason Pierce of Spiritualized and Spacemen 3 fame) the song is so good (not to mention a perfect album closer) that you don’t notice the track length. A highly recommended album from a band very much on the up.

 

Cotonete – “Super-vilains”

I first discovered Cotonete when they popped up on a Spotify Release Radar playlist towards the end of last year. I instantly liked this French Funk band, in fact, Spotify is pretty good at finding me groovy music from the other side of the English Channel. I suspect this goes back to all the mid 70s Serge Gainsbourg albums I’ve listened in the last four years!!! Cotonete are influenced by The JB’s (James Brown’s famous late 60’s backing band), Headhunters era Herbie Hancock and Brazilian acts such as Deodato and Banda Black Rio. It’s a potent and funky cocktail with deep basslines, punchy horns, cutting rhythm guitar and a truckload of percussion atop top notch drummer David Georgelet. This is music that is at home on the dancefloor as it would soundtrack the car chase in The French Connection or when the tempo drops it’s perfect music to chill out to. I can’t recommend this album enough and I think it will be one of those under the radar gems that gets overlooked. Don’t sleep on it!!!

 

Malibu Ken – “Malibu Ken”

Ok, so when this album was first announced late last year my initial reaction was 1) What? This is seems like a strange collaboration (Malibu Ken is a collaboration between Underground Hip-Hop MC/Producer Aesop Rock and Psychedelic Electro Hip-Hop Producer and founder of Black Moth Super Rainbow Tobacco). 2) If it works it’s could be awesome. Then I heard the first single ‘Acid King’ and watched it’s accompanying video I was excited about the potential for the album. A couple of months later the album dropped I wasn’t disappointed the album is a fantastic blend of Electro Hip-Hop and Funk tunes with Aesop Rock bring his own verbose lyrical content and amazing flow that have become his trademark since his enter to the music world with his debut album ‘Float’ in the year 2000. This album is in and out in thirty five minutes but you don’t any more music as it’s a wholly satisfying album. If this is the only Malibu Ken album that they’ll have a 100% knockout for us all to love for years to come. If Aesop and Tobacco continue to collaborate and create albums of this quality then we’ll be incredibly lucky. What are you waiting for check it out!!!

 

Cosey Fanni Tutti – “Tutti”

Cosey Fanni Tutti has been a member of not one but two great Electronic music acts first of all she was a member of Industrial music pioneers Throbbing Gristle (1975-2012) and then her a partner Chris Carter (also a member of Throbbing Gristle) formed Chris & Cosey (1981-) and pursued a soft Electro/Techno direction. On her second solo album she digs deep into dark Electro/Techno territory but with a couple of surprises. The first surprise is that while you can dance to some of the tracks on this album a majority are slower and feature thicker heavier sounds. This wasn’t what I was expecting after hearing the title track on Spotify. However, this is no negative as Tutti expertly creates these atmospheric and engaging tracks. The other surprise was the use of a Cornet as the lead instrument of the title track Tutti has played violin in the past at early Throbbing Gristle shows but as far as I’m aware the Cornet is a new instrument to her. I definitely think the Cornet adds something to the title track both adding a more human feel and more dissonance. If you like Electronic music you’ll get a lot of “Tutti” it covers Electro/Techno and Ambient music across it’s tightly packed 38 minutes and doesn’t waste a single moment. It’s the sound of veteran showing she still has plenty to offer even in an ever changing world.

Octo Octa – “For Lovers” EP

This EP opens with ‘I Need You’ the most blissful ten minutes of music that I’ve heard so far this year. It’s envelopes you in it’s vocals moans and multi layered synths pads, it’s warm and welcoming and will always put a smile on your face on matter what else is going on or has gone on. Second track ‘Bodies Meld Together’ goes back to the 90’s for a breakbeat techno beat making for a hard beat but no less harmonious and luxurious synth layers and it’s a contrast that really works. The EP is rounded out by ‘Loops For Healing’ which a lilting melody with deep House chords and bass drum throb. Overall this is an EP that works thematically but each track stands alone as it’s own piece quite an achievement. Highly recommended.

 

Kokoroko – ‘Kokoroko’ EP

This is London 8 piece Jazz/Funk/Afrobeat band Kokoroko’s debut release though the band has been playing gigs together for a number of years now. You really should watch their set for The Boiler Room, I’ll embed it at the bottom of this post. The EP kicks off with ‘Adwa’ it’s funky Afrobeat shuffle and with bands every powerful horns taking the lead on this track. There is a break down for a guitar solo and then builds back into a sax solo before returning to the main horn refrain. The goes more down tempo and softer with their playing on the ‘Ti-de’ it’s a thoughtful track but never ponderous and the instruments have equal billing. There are even some nice female vocal harmonies towards the end of the track. ‘Uman’ is up next starting off a little slow but when the drums and bass kick in were back in Afrobeat territory again the horns the real leaders though this time they play sharp staccato lines. The EP ends with ‘Abusey Junction’ which originally appeared on the ‘We Out Here’ (2018) compilation that bought showcased the burgeoning and diverse current Jazz scene in London. The track is down tempo and focus more on the guitar, percussion, bass and electric piano compared with a lot of Kokoroko’s music to date, it’s an excellent track on a great EP. I ‘d really like to see Kokoroko live as I missed my chance last year and I can’t wait to hear what they deliver on their debut album, they are a band that has already shown they can be fantastic and yet still show so much promise.

 

Let me know what you think of these releases and about your favourites in the Comments below.

 

 

Late last year a single called ‘Yesterday’ by an Artist called Connie Constance popped up in a Spotify Release Radar playlist and I liked it and was intrigued by it. My first thought was that I couldn’t place what music might have influenced this combination of Synths and Soul. This week listening to Constance’s debut album “English Rose” it hit that it was Stevie Wonder that was the Artist ‘Yesterday’ was indirectly referencing. It’s this that really sums up Constance and her music, she’s really hard to pin down and reading her Artist bio it starts to make sense this is a person whose never fit in. Constance grew up in Watford a suburb of North London and pretty leafy, white middle class one at that. She stuck as a young mixed girl surrounded by white people.

This is a theme that continues throughout the album with neither Constance’s voice, lyrics nor the music styles and elements she’s using fitting nicely into easy categorization. Her voice can easily be compared to Otis Redding, Ari Up from The Slits and Bjork (though she doesn’t push her voice as far as a young Bjork did) and the music ranges from Neo Soul ballads to Indie Rock stomp via nods to contemporary dance music. Another helpfully reference point is Amy Winehouse due the F-Bombs, bitter songs about exes, unashamed use of her London accent and the fact that across the album she can sound both young and wise beyond her years. All-in-all though Connie Constance is Connie Constance a square peg in a round hole. Check out “English Rose” below and let me know what you think if the Comments below:

 

Sonic Fiction is back!!!

Hello Sonic Fiction readers,

My name is Liam and I’m founder and main for Sonic Fiction. I know that the blog has been dormant since February 2017 and I haven’t posted regularly since the Summer of 2016 but that is about to change.

In fact, a lot about the blog is changing rather than being a critical music blog as it had future posts will be more about informal music debate, discussion and recommendations. Don’t worry if you’re someone who really enjoys the critcal music reviews and articles this will be coming back in a different format later in the year. I warn you however that anything critcal music wise is very much at the idea stage and I won’t have a chance to properly research and plan for it’s launch until later in the year.

In the meantime to celebrate Sonic Fiction’s relaunch I will be posting something to the blog everyday for a month (ending on the 6th May) and I hope this new direction and content will be enjoyed by all readers of the site. Planned posts include a Best Releases of the Year…so far (this will be at least 2 parts maybe more and posted once weekly until all the posts are published), Discovery of the Week (I’m hoping this will become a regular feature) and Music Question(s) (on a Sunday) – where I will post Rough Trade Shops question for that week and we can discuss and debate it in the Comments.

Keep an eye out for new posts on the site or via my Twitter.

Let me know what you think of the new Sonic Fiction in the Comments.

Kirsty’s Recommendations

20th May

Laurel Halo – “Behind the Green Door” EP (Hyperdub)

Laurel Halo’s first release of 2013 is the EP “Behind the Green Door”. Recalling Halo’s earlier releases such as “Hour Logic” and the “Spring” EP under her King Felix alias, this EP’s central theme is stripped back techno married with ambient detail. Building on her new direction for live sets, “Behind the Green Door” uses hardware and live instruments, specifically a detuned piano, to create classic Detroit and modern techno influenced tracks of bass-driven rhythms, sinister melodies and lush harmony.

Listen to the very Detroit techno ‘Throw’, perhaps a nod to the Paperclip People (Carl Craig) track of the same name, below.

 

27th May

Laura Marling – “Once I Was An Eagle” (Virgin)

Laura Marling’s back with her fourth album in five years, “Once I Was An Eagle”. Since her the release of her debut album “Alas, I Cannot Swim” in 2008, Marling has released a further three, “Once I was An Eagle” included, in quick succession. The pinnacle of these being 2011’s brooding “A Creature I Don’t Know”. Each album has built on her blend of sharp, lyrical wordplay and a folky musical template built on harnessed anger. With the announcement of “Once I Was An Eagle” (for some reason all of her album titles feature six syllables), Marling has introduced the organ-heavy ‘Where Can I Go?’, displaying she’s at her best when she builds songs slowly from the subtle duo of her cool voice and acoustic guitar to a full band confrontation by the end.  The second taster is the rolling ‘Master Hunter’, which features the very Marling vocal performance of sounding both calm and pissed off.

Liam’s Recommendations

7th May 2013

Talib Kweli – ‘Prisoner of Conscious’ (Blacksmith)

After releasing ‘Gutter Rainbows’ Kweli is to release this new album that he promises will surprise his hardcore fans (and I imagine his critics who say he’s one dimensional) as he takes a different lyrical tack. Guests slots go to Mos Def, Curren$y, Jean Grae, Maino and Nelly?!?, production comes from Hi-Tek, Madlib, Oh No, Terence Martin, E. Jones, Rahki and Symbolic 1.

13th May 2012

Colleen – “The Weighing of the Heart” (Second Language)

The long awaited (5 years in the making) third album from Colleen finally arrives in May. FACT magazine have compared the album to fellow cellist Arthur Russell and two of the world best drone artists Grouper and Lichens. The album is influenced by obscure ethnic traditional music and religious texts and was recorded in a disused olive shop in Spain.

20th May 2013

Daft Punk – “Random Access Memories” (Columbia/Daft Life)

Recent reports confirm that the legendary French dance duo have been collaborating with Niles Rodgers of Chic, veteran songwriter Paul Williams and Panda Bear of Animal Collective on tracks due for inclusion on the album. Looking forward to hearing the results of those collaborations.

G&D – “The Lighthouse” (SomeOthaShip)

G&D sees rootsy singer and beatmaker Georgia Anne Muldrow team up with life-partner Dudley Perkins, aka Oxnard rapper and singer Declaime. Muldrow’s last album was last year’s Seeds, a dusky collection of psychotropic soul produced entirely by Madlib. Perkins, meanwhile, dropped the rap-heavy Self Study LP in 2011, produced by Muldrow. The pair clearly don’t give much of a hoot about the work-life partition; they operate the SomeOthaShip Connect label together, and have pooled resources on a full-length (2007′s The Message Uni Versa) and a string of short-form releases since. New album The Lighthouse, credited to G&D, will arrive in the height of May on SomeOthaShip. A heady brew of hip-hop, jazz and soul is promised – we wouldn’t expect any less.

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