Tag Archive: Drexciya


Some Releases we missed in June

Mind Over Mirrors – “High & Upon” (Aguirre Records)

Jamie Fennelly’s best known for his work as a member of Peeesseye a U.S. drone/noise trio who’ve combined “elements of warped rock architecture, freejazz horror, intergalactic glossolalia and stripped down abstract expressionism” together since 2002. This is a reissue of his debut limited edition cassette release on Gift Tapes from 2011. The album starts with the thick hypnotic harmonium and Fender Rhodes through delays and synth drone that is ‘I’m willing to stagger’ a challenging and unorthodox opening that never the less reward the listener with its complexity and depth. This followed by a sparse and disorienting guitar and harmonium of ‘Harmattan Morning’ which kind of sounds like sunned warped version of “Tomorrow Never Knows” by The Beatles. Finally we’re treated to the sparse piano and steady emolliating organ and synth drone of ‘Mountain Convalesence’ a 15 minute epic. Though not a the type of release we generally cover on Sonic Fiction “High & Upon” is definetly worth checking out via Mind Over Mirrors Soundcloud as is the even more brilliant “The Voice Rolling”. You can buy “High & Upon” via Boomkat on vinyl or digital download. I hope they soon stock the sold out “The Voice Rolling” digitally too.

Bear Bones, Lay Low – “El Telonero” (Kraak Records)

Prior to this album Bear Bones, Lay Low’s biggest exposure outside of the noise/drone music scene was his fantastic contribution to Crammed Disc’s Congotronics vs Rockers compilation. This album is quite different from that track concentrating on creating short and satisfying songs heavily influenced by the krautrock of Can, Harmonia, the post-punk electronic synth music of Cabaret Voltaire and Ekoplekz, Jamaica dub and his cosmic contemporaries Black Moth Super Rainbow. The music is far more relaxed and colourful than what I had expected in fact it ranges from the brightness of ‘A Fourth Ring’ and ‘Bien Gracias’ to the deep dark undercurrent of ‘Drive Sucks’ and many shades in between. There are many artists recreating the sounds of krautrock artists such as Harmonia, Can and Cluster and a large majority sound like retreads but a combination of his weaving of other influences into his tracks and something that I just can’t put my finger helps Bear Bones, Lay Low rises above these mere imitators. It’s genuinely great to hear an artist who feels at once like he’s exploring with his instruments and at the same time creating such convincing and brilliant tracks. Definitely one for fans of any of the artists and genres mentioned above and adventurous listeners will be rewarded!!!

Chevel – “Reset EP” (self-released)

Techno producer and DJ Chevel (Dario Tronchin), from Treviso, Italy, self-released “Reset”, a mini-album of spaced-out techno, this month. Having previously created mixes for the highly-respected Stroboscopic Artifacts, the label headed by fellow Italian Lucy, Chevel’s “Reset” contains tracks that are in comparison to his SA material, sexier and slower with greater focus on rhythm and warmth. There is rawness to Chevel’s work, which comes by way of his live recording process and analogue gear, including a Roland SH101 and 606, sequencer and various modular synths. The Italian’s one-take shots capture the improvised patterns and spontaneous tweaks that result in a primitive yet controlled cut. Though now living near Venice, Chevel used to live in Berlin where he explored Basic Channel, Berghain and the records stocked in Hard Wax. The tracks on “Reset” undoubtedly show the energy and influence he soaked up during his time in the capital. ‘Reset One’ has a satisfyingly thudding bass drum with an intensely resonant bass line that rises and falls. ‘Reset Three’ is a warm, grooving techno cut with a signal-like delayed synth riff that rings out over Basic Channel-style drum programming. The slow, swarming synth notes and forceful, heads down German techno drum rhythm that makes up ‘Reset Four’ is as good as Marcel Dettmann’s own sex-infused push-and-pull rhythms. With an introduction of a thick analogue bass drum and a more discernible melodic motif it becomes a driving, silvery techno cut similar to the works of Morphosis or Claudio PRC, another exciting Italian talent whose album “Inner State” won a place on my ‘Albums of The Year…so far’ list. July will see the release of Chevel’s “The Building EP”, the second of a three part series.

The Cinematic Orchestra – “In Motion #1” (Ninja Tune)

The new release from The Cinematic Orchestra (TCO) is the first in a series of compilation albums on which TCO, their closet musical friends and other artists on Ninja Tune and its family of labels create new scores for classic silent films. For the first in the series they invited jazz pianist and Flying Lotus collaborator Austin Peralta, abstract hip-hop/electronica producer Dorian Concept and regular TCO guest vocalist Grey Reverend to contribute and collaborate. TCO kick off the album themselves and though the sound (strings, synth bass and heavily processed synths) aren’t their usual fare the atmosphere they create will be familiar to TCO fans, when they kick in the acoustic drums are the things that reminders the listen who they are listening to and the track takes off from there. Next up is Peralta’s contribution a minimal stately piece utilise his piano skills alongside a string quartet that feature throughout the album. Dorian Concept’s two piece in collaboration with TCO saxophonist Tom Chant take a different tack, the first ‘Outer Space’ combines Smeared psychedelic strings and effects with the string quartets dry sound and a wobbly echo leaden solo from Chant. Similarly ‘Dream Work’ uses abstract sounds and processes acoustic instruments this time for a haunting effect, to send a chill down the spine. ‘Entr’acte’ (TCO) begins with  strings and bowed double bass moving at a glacial pace before halfway through the track it turns into an instrumental and much more elaborate version of TCO’s ‘To Build A Home’, as the track enters its last quarter the string quartet and shuffling drums add much needed tension and release. ‘Regen’ featuring the acoustic guitar of Grey Reverend and double bass of Phil France of TCO is a spare and emotional effecting track that is far greater than the majority of the tracks from his debut album from last year. The album closes with ‘Manhatta’ (TCO) with its dreamy strings, TCO groove and acoustic guitar that recalls “Ma Flour” (2007) the bands last studio album. The criticisms I can really leave at this album is that some tracks lack the tension of TCO’s previous studio albums and that this may have worked better as a DVD where the experience would be completed, however you can create this yourself using Youtube. Though “In Motion #1” isn’t the best album on TCO’s back catalogue it’s still a  very strong album and well worth investigation.

KonKoma – “KonKoma” (Soundway)

We don’t usually feature the brilliant releases by Soundway Records as they generally focus on reissues and compilations of West African Afrobeat and High Life music as well as music from Columbia and Central America and these releases do not fit into our remit. However, KonKoma are an active London-based band inspired by Ghanaian Afrobeat and High Life and this release is their début album. It’s an impressive start too as the band not only perfect assimilate the main sounds and aesthetics of this music but move it forward with sensitive modern production that doesn’t take anything from the origins of the genres and some slower paced material that demonstrates this music needn’t be all about out of the traps drums breaks and funk bass lines. The band is also great at arrangements subtly but effective utilising the vast array of instruments and vocals in the mix to create dynamic, spacious tracks that keep the listen on their toes while never disrupting the grooves of the tracks. KonKoma have produced a début album that shows off their musical and production skills and points the way forward for Western African music that could have become a stagnant museum piece, highly recommended.

The Invisible – “Rispah” (Ninja Tune)

I remember the self titled debut album from The Invisible leaving little impression on me back in 2009. I wanted to like it and it seemed they were trying to attain something to but falling short and never quite convincing me, the listener. I’m glad to say that on “Rispah” (named after singer and guitar Dave Okumu’s late mother) that they’ve achieved an arresting and emotive sound that combines electronics, guitar, drums, bass, gentle vocals and a ton of hooks and they are now the complete package. The album is thoroughly modern combining traditional band performs with electronic music production, sounds and programming all delivered with a strong emotive punch. Though the album sounds on its own, there does seem to be a hint of TV on the Radio to The Invisible’s sound. Whenever a band attempts this kind of merger of sounds it often lacks the tunefulness and heart of this release, the band too busy being clever-clever or fussing over sonic details. The album never feels like a deathly dirge could so easily have become after the death of Dave Okumu’s mother instead it a bright and almost optimistic record full of hope and redemption. “Rispah” is a pleasure to listen to in every respect; it could a dark horse in the race for album of the year.

Disappointment of the Month

Florian Meindl  – “WAVES” (Flash Recordings)

Working as a sound designer and producer, Florian Meindl has a reputation built on his high production values and “WAVES”, the Austrian’s debut, maintains this standard. Indeed, for audiophiles there is a 4GB USB stick available to purchase with high resolution masters of the tracks. For all the undeniable production quality “WAVES” is missing something: an emotional pull, a heart to balance the dryness of sheer good production. Even ‘Isa’, a house track built on flourishes of piano chords that is dedicated to Meindl’s girlfriend, is insignificant and simply grooves away anonymously. Begging the question: how did dedicating a song to a meaningful person result in a meaningless track? Can Meindl only provide music that serves a practical purpose? There are some great tracks like ‘What Is Techno’, a powerful, dirty techno track with an irresistible bass drum, clap and hi-hat groove. A low male voice asks “What is techno? What is house?” while a percussive melody drives the listener to the dancefloor. ‘Spread Out’, a dark techno track dense with claps and percussion which build to an irresistible, surging synth melody with a cry of pain/ecstasy underneath. This stands out as does the fun and bouncy ‘Good Times’. Hats, a deep bass drum and a metallic synth punch as Ricardo Phillips’s vocals command we “let the good time roll.” This and a track like ‘It’s all making sense now’ would sound incredible in a club context: the immense bass drums hit in you in the chest and the bass lines and drum grooves bully you into dancing. The rises and falls tease and pummel. Away from this context, say listening at home “WAVES” doesn’t work. There is little if any emotion to be found in the head-pounding drums and aloof synth melodies. Besides, would the average listener have the equipment to do justice to the range and richness of frequencies “WAVES” contains? The different tack Meindl attempts with ‘Isa’ and ‘Wishful Thinking’ feat. Detachments falls flat. ‘Wishful Thinking’ needs Sascha Ring’s (Apparat) gorgeous voice, not the current singer’s uninspiring monotone, to carry the song to the emotional point it’s trying to achieve. Releasing the club tracks as 12”s may have been a cleverer option than compiling them in a form that rarely naturally suits techno.

Mortiz Von Oswald Trio – “Fetch” (Honest Jon’s)

Consisting of four long-form compositions that entwine elements of dub, techno and jazz, “Fetch” is darker and danker than Moritz Von Oswald Trio’s previous albums “Vertical Ascent” and “Horizontal Structures”. The oppressive opening track ‘Jam’ unfolds over 17 and a half minutes with acoustic percussion instrumentation, brass and woodind phrases, dissonant textures, puncturing stabs of delayed bass and a drum machine backbeat that meander beneath Sebastian Studnitzky’s darting trumpet melodies. Second is ‘Dark’, which drops the pace down further and maintains the tension and sense of dread that ‘Jam’ introduced the listener to. The beat is kept nodding underneath effected sound textures, viscous bass and steely horn melodies. The album’s standout is the dancefloor-in-mind ‘Club’. Steeped in Von Oswald’s Basic Channel pioneering mode of minimal/dub techno. The twelve minute track is built on a 4/4 bass drum and 16th note hi-hat pattern that pushes the listener into techno territory. Bass frequencies growl, percussion strikes and a distant two-note synth melody is surrounded by noisy atmospherics and ghostly textures; creating a hypnotic track that remains fluid as opposed to the usual grid-based structure of techno. The mid-tempo ‘Yangissa’ closes “Fetch”. Its simmering brass and tumbling African nyabinghi-style drums weave into a dub-influenced shuffle.

Bobby Womack – “The Bravest Man in the Universe” (XL)

Bobby Womack’s new album is a triumphant return for the soul veteran, after the success of his collaboration with Gorillaz in 2010, on the “Plastic Beach” album which finished at number 2 in my (Liam, Sonic Fiction editor) Top 20 Albums of the Year that year. “The Bravest Man in the Universe” is similar to Gil Scott-Heron’s “I’m New Here” (2010) which was also produced by Richard Russell, in that it brings together modern genres and production techniques with a black music star of the 70’s. One of the main ways this album distinguishes its self is that whereas “I’m New Here” was very focused on atmosphere to back poetry, melody is always front and centre here. The album focus around hip-hop beats, probing synth bass, strings and piano with Womack’s soulful, emotive and expressive vocals always taking the lead and slotting perfectly into a through modern backing. The music recalls everything from trip-hop (Portishead, Massive Attack), cinematic hip-hop/jazz (The Cinematic Orchestra) and the dance-pop and cartoon funk of co-produce Damon Albarn’s Gorillaz. Despite all this genre-hopping the album hangs to together and only one of the track truly lets the side down the Lana Del Rey duet ‘Dayglo Reflection’ in which Del Rey feels like she’s been dropped in at the last second in a cynical record company marketing ploy. This aside it’s great to hear Womack back doing what he does best: singing and writing great soulful pop music that sticks in the brain long after the music has stopped.

Oh No – “OhNoMite” (Traffic Records)

Oh No’s “OhNoMite” is another in a string of impressive hip-hop albums released in 2012 up there with releases from Killer Mike, El-P, Thee Satisfaction, Doseone and Quakers. In fact, the album’s overall sound and approach has much in common with Quakers self titled debut as both albums hark back to classic 90’s hip-hop sound, the main difference being “OhNoMite”s source material. The album is entirely made of samples from Rudy Ray Moore’s audio achieves drawing heavily on the soundtrack to Blaxploitation film “Dolemite” from the album takes its title. As a result of this the album is pack full of funk loops, smoky jazz chords and swinging tough hip-hop beats that get your head nodding. Another similarity with the Quakers album is that this is also stuffed with guest appears but doesn’t suffer from attention deficit disorder, each MC contributing high quality raps that fit into the album overall theme. The old skool styling’s of album don’t get in the way of enjoying it, in fact it’s a major part of “OhNoMite”’s appeal. One of the stand-out elements of the album is the fantastic array of analogue synth sounds that feature throughout; it’s also a sound that doesn’t always bed in well in straight hip-hop tracks, in my opinion and Oh No’s production’s successful ingrate them with thrilling results. This is a thoroughly brilliant and refreshing hip-hop record that will appeal to fans of Madlib, The Alchemist and filthy funk 90s classic hip-hop.

Doseone – “G Is For Deep” (Anticon)

The long awaited new solo album by cLOUDDEAD co-founder Doseone is one of the finest releases by any member of that trio since their self titled debut album in 2001. It picks up where the last Subtle (a spin off project from Doseone and Jel of cLOUDDEAD) left off but with a much greater emphasis on space and pop hooks. Throughout Doseone strikes a balance between chip tune elements and deep probing electro beats and strong melodic content. The releases of by cLOUDDEAD and their related projects have always used ambience in conjunction with beats and rapping but here it feels more like Doseone is tapping into a rich vein of dream-pop that recalls the Cocteau Twins in their 80’s pomp. The new found space and melodic clarity make for a more immediate listening experience though there are still enough twists and turns to keep long time fans interested, I’m sure some will see this as a compromise but this genuinely feels like a natural evolution for a unique artist.

Delta Funktionen – “Traces” (Delsin)

After four years of releasing EPs on the Delsin and Ann Aimee labels and DJing across Europe, Delta Funktionen (Niels Luinenburg) takes the next step and translates his skills to the album format. This is a hurdle where many talented techno producers falter as shown by Florian Meindl’s disappointing “WAVES”; it is one thing to produce a potent dance floor EP but it’s another to come up with fresh ideas and approaches that can carry the weight of a much longer format. Happily, Luinenberg joins that small group of techno artists who have made the transition. The Dutch producer has said that research was key in his approach for “Traces” and he aimed to pair “a raw, machine made aesthetic with plenty of real human soul and palpable earthly emotion.” “Traces” covers a lot of ground within electronic music sub-genres. The influence of Detroit and European techno, Italo-disco and electro are strongly felt. Album opener ‘Frozen Land’ is a track of driving, futuristic electro with a Model 500-esque rhythm of percussion, echoing claps and shuffling bass drum. Its metallic sheen is speared by the undercurrent of tension in the austere synths that recall Drexciya. The searing acidic synths and driving hats of ‘Enter’ bleed through the warm, thick texture of the analogue equipment to create a pure electro cut. This opening pair introduces the album’s over-arching principles. The pacing and structure of “Traces” is classic techno: start slow then gradually build to an opening up in the track’s centre, drop and then return to a visceral fury until the end. The bass frequencies are the star of the album. ‘Redemption’ features possibly the most resonant bass line you’ll hear this year. The subterranean bass drum pounds under a forceful hats and clap pattern while the central melody played on a sparkling synth rips through the air. This visceral and raging track demands to be included in DJ sets. ‘Utopia’, a techno/italo-disco cut, speeds the tempo up. A thick, resonant bassline and tight claps are complimented by washes of atmospheric chords and an ascending/descending melody played on a thin, bright synth. A section at 4:40 minutes breaks down to just the bass drum, hats and that deep, warm bass. The re-introduction of the melody and chords lifts ‘Utopia’ to an evocative finale. An elegy to Detroit techno, ‘Challenger’ is a seductive track composed of a purring bass line and slowly, evolving underwater synth chords, which provides a moment of reflection after the furious intensity of the previous tracks. ‘On A Distant Journey’ is perhaps the finest moment on “Traces”. As with the rest of the album, Luinenberg draws inspiration from classic techno and electro sounds. Its ten minute run-time boasts drum rhythms that raise the spirit of Detroit techno innovators such as Derrick May and Juan Atkins and merges this with the emotive synth melodies of Kraftwerk. Just when the listener is convinced that they are being taken on a meditative trip, it unexpectedly drops to vicious drums and distorted acid riffs before veering back to the track’s initial esoteric journey. Conversely to Meindl’s “WAVES”, Luinenberg doesn’t lose sight in intricate sound-design and instead allows the pure power of machines to control “Traces”. By doing this Delta Funktionen proves to be one of the few to thrive in this challenging setting for techno producers.

Peaking Lights – “Lucifer” (Weird World)

The stunning new album from Peaking Lights showcases a more immediate version of their sound from previous foggy lo-fi releases. In fact along with Julia Holter’s “Ekstatis” this album proves that lo-fi home recordings can have a clarity and immediacy without sacrificing the grit that made them attractive in the first place. “Lucifer” acts a cooling balm or cool stream water leaping at your feet instead of the more humid and clammy sound of 2011 brilliant “936”, though it’s a little unfair to directly compare those two albums “Lucifer” demonstrates the duo ability to subtle involve their sound while still using the same basic sound set. Maybe the biggest difference musical is that Peaking Lights have chosen to create more up tempo track this time round compared with leisurely to sluggish pace of previous work, this seems to run in tandem with their new clearer and more immediate sound. The best examples of this are the funk strut of ‘Dream Beat’, the pumping bass and purposeful drum beat of ‘Live Love’ and its darker musical twin ‘Midnight (in the Valley of the Shadows)’. Peaking Lights also add some new elements to the album such as marimba on ‘Moonrise’, piano on ‘Beautiful Son’ and an Oriental melody on ‘Live Love’, that it would e great to hear more of future releases. All in all I’d through recommend “Lucifer” to Peaking Lights fans, those who are curious about the duo or those whose interest is piqued by this write up, it’s well worth investigating.

Liars – “WIXIW” (Mute Records)

The new album from Liars is quite a departure from their previous efforts. The band completely abandoned their usual guitar, drums and bass combination and composed and recorded the album almost entirely using computer music technology. The album covers quite a lot of electronic music territory from dark techno to Matthew Dear style electro-pop, techno-punk and glitch electronica recalling Mouse On Mars. Angus Andrew’s vocal are still front and centre on the album but he’s quieter and more reflective on ‘”WIXIW”, the depth of his vocal brings to mind Matthew Dear’s deep tones. I was half expecting the band’s inexperience with music technology to result in basic and generic sounds but the lush synths and subtle drums are executed expertly. Another big difference is that melodies are given the room to breathe and atonal sounds are kept to a minimum and every track is more spacious than anything previously recorded by this ambitious and experimental band. In many ways this is Liars’ most conventional release but this is no bad thing as it showcases a different side to the band rather than being a betrayal of their previous work and ethos. This is the band’s most immediate release and I feel sure it will reward listeners even more every time they revisit it.

Joint Top Release of the Month

Christian Löffler – “A Forest” (Ki)

The forests of north Germany in which Christian Löffler lived during the making of the album are the backbone of “A Forest” and Löffler’s work as a visual artist informs his focus on narrating a story as would happen with a collection of photographs or paintings. Over the twelve tracks that make-up “A Forest”, a rich yet spacious tapestry gradually unfurls. “A Forest” sits together as one piece, an entrancingly atmospheric whole. Warm, organic samples of wooden percussion are underpinned with fragile synth melodies; the chord progressions recall John Tejada’s melancholy, sunset-tinged tracks, combined with Pantha du Prince’s percussive textures and attention to detail. Although the 4/4 bass drum dominates rhythmically, it remains unobtrusive, lying low in the mix beneath the hypnotic, dreamlike atmosphere.  The title track features John Tejada-style collapsing chords atop a warm bass line and slight percussion and bell-like instrumentation. The three vocalists on “A Forest”, Gry, Mohna and Marcus Roloff, are a new dimension to Löffler’s productions and give the album an even greater emotional resonance. Mohna’s dreamy, fragile voice on ‘Eleven’ is surrounded by buzzing noises and distant bass frequencies. In one section her looped voice sits between chopping hi-hats and a bass line that rolls back and forth like sea waves. The beautiful ‘Feelharmonia’ features the Danish singer Gry whose mournful voice is embraced by shuffling percussion, syncopated drums, tapping wood blocks and a bouncing synth pattern. It is a standout in its wonderful melancholic simplicity. An interesting track is ‘Signals’, which is inspired by the Tintinnabuli compositional style of Estonian composer Arvo Pärt. The bells are brought to the dancefloor by a techno shuffle of bass drum, hats and claps.

‘Blind’ is a deeply moving sunset-suited track of ambient pads, rolling percussion, softly distorted bass, a distant male vocal and an elegiac atmosphere. ‘Swift Code’ is another notable inclusion. Lyricist and poet Marcus Roloff’s German poem passages alternate between implicit and explicitly threatening verses, which are encircled by crackles and floating glassy textures; the ambience circling like birds. On a ‘Hundred Lights’ a 4/4 bass drum finally comes out from the under the mix and pushes determinedly against an undulating bass line. Digital synthesis bubbles and wooden percussion, which features heavily throughout the album in reflection of the forest of the album’s title, chops through the atmosphere. ‘Slowlight’ is an effortless track. A simple melody loops, a bass line engulfs and a rhythm of bass drum and claps pushes and pulls. Wooden percussion grows in intensity as licks of reverb are applied and a brittle synth enters in the final seconds bringing “A Forest” to a delicate close.

Neneh Cherry and The Thing – “The Cherry Thing” (Smalltown Supersound)

When it was originally announced that Neneh Cherry and Swedish jazz trio The Thing would be releasing an album full of reinterpreted versions of songs in a range of genres from post-punk to hip-hop via jazz itself, the collaboration didn’t make sense to me. However, after a little internet research and hearing two tracks from the album my mind was changed and I got quite excited about the prospect of this album. It doesn’t let me down either with The Thing more restrained than they usually are and Cherry on dazzling form on vocals. The album opens with a version of Cherry’s ‘Cashback’ (one of two originals on the album) featuring fantastic twangy double bass, a drum break and counterpoint sax playing off her melodious lead vocal. Things get striped back on a twinkling vibraphone heavy version of Suicide’s ‘Dream Baby Dream’ before a return to a more aggressive tone with the drum and double bass assault of ‘Too Tough To Die’ (Martina Topley Bird). Next up ‘Sudden Movement’ the other original this time written by Mats Gustafsson of The Thing, a dark and dusty yet up beat jazz number. The tempo slows again for Madvillain’s ‘Accordion’ with Cherry trying a half sung half rapped vocal over twangy double bass and subtle arching sax. There are also two nods to Cherry’s father Don (a famous jazz musician, The Thing take their name from one of his songs) the first is by Don himself the ghostly and experimental ‘Golden Heart’ the other is a track original by jazz innovator Ornette Coleman whom Don Cherry complete his jazz apprenticeship with, this track is a sparse finish to a busy and fiery album full of passion and heat. Recommend to fans of the unexpectedly enjoyable!!!

Drokk – “Music Inspired by Mega City One” (Stones Throw/Invada Records)

With “Music Inspired by Mega City One” Geoff Barrow (Portishead) and BBC composer Ben Salisbury have created an imaginary soundtrack that evokes the sprawling metropolis at the heart of the Judge Dredd comics. Centred around a Oberheim analogue synthesizer the duo’s aim is to revisit classic electronic soundtracks of the 70’s and 80’s especially the work of John Carpenter, Giorgio Moroder and Vangelis. A must for analogue synth and film music enthusiasts.

Killer Mike & El-P – “R.A.P. Music” 14th May (Williams Street Records)

For years Killer Mike and El-P have been friends and admired each others work and so it was only so long before they collaborated together. So far four tracks from the album have been unleashed upon the world and they’ve all been satifisying heavy hip-hop tracks showcasing the best of both contributors. El-P’s blistering beats and twisted sample mangling are the perfect foil for the socially conscious lyrics and unpredictable flow of Killer Mike.

El-P – “Cancer for the Cure” 21st May (Fat Possum Records)

After a few years away from the limelight this is El-P’s second release of May. Early reviews and pre-release track “The Full Retard” suggest its business as usual for the legendary underground hip-hop producer, though their are more guest than there has been on previous El-P solo albums. Its no bad thing if El-P produces more of the same as his style is his and his alone and I feel critics miss the subtle tweaks that he applies to his sound with each new release. Fans of undeground hip-hop could be in for a double whammy of quality hip-hop from El-P this month.

Pantha Du Prince and Stephan Abry – “Ursprung” 21st May (Dial)

Acclaimed techno producer Pantha Du Prince and the experimental artist Stephan Abry (Workshop) collaborate for “Ursprung” (meaning origin in German). Recalling Can, Cluster and Harmonia, the first track ‘Exodus Now’ is dense with guitar chords, thin synths, percussion, a motorik rhythm and buzzing noise. The hand of Hendrik Weber (Pantha Du Prince) can be heard in the fleet-footed hi-hats and high-pitched percussion, with a move to African-sounding percussion halfway through the track, adding an extra dimension. Texturally and atmospherically ‘Exodus Now’ is mesmerizing and “Ursprung” could be as sublime and intricate as Pantha Du Prince’s beautiful “Black Noise”, which Stephan Abry contributed to. The accompanying video was filmed in north Norway above the Arctic Circle in January 2012. Highly recommended.

Jherek Bischoff – “Composed” 28th May (Leaf  Label)

“Composed” is the latest album from contemporary classical composer/musician Bischoff and features a stellar array of guests, including ex-Talking Head David Byrne, Brazilian Tropicalismo legend Caetano Veloso, Craig Wedren (Shudder to Think), Mirah, Carla Bozulich (Evangelista, The Geraldine Fibbers), Faun Fables’ Dawn McCarthy, Nels Cline (Wilco) and Deerhoof’s Greg Saunier. You can watch a trailer featuring snippets of songs from the album here.

Doseone – “G Is For Deep” 28th May (Anticon)

His first solo album since 2007 promises to be a welcome return for the ex-cLOUDDEAD founder. Pre-release track ‘Last Life’ combines Doseone’s idiosyncratic vocal/rap stylings with his most pop oriented melody to date. It’s the sort of track that puts a smile on your face and it’s got me (Liam, Sonic Fiction Editor) very excited about “G Is For Deep”.

Drexciya – “Journey of the Deep Sea Dweller II” 21st May (Clone Classic Cuts)

Clone are revisiting Drexciya’s revered back catalogue via a series of compilations. The first focused on their earliest productions and this release, “Journey of the Deep Sea Dweller II”, travels through their EPs from the mid and late ’90s like “Return of Drexciya”, “Journey Home”, “The Quest” and the rare “Uncharted” EP. The collection also includes “The Davey Jones Locker,” which originally appeared on the compilation “True People: The Detroit Techno Album”. It’s due for release in the middle of May. This collection is ideal for collectors and those who are only just discovering the work of this mythical duo.

Laurel Halo – “Quarantine” 28th May (Hyperdub Records)

After a string of hugely impressive EP’s including the recent “Spring” EP as King Felix, Halo finally releases her debut album. Early reports that she’s shifted back towards the ethereal pop of her very earliest releases, in a recent interview Halo even went as far to say “I wanted to combine the sounds of my previous records into something cohesive”. She also said that she’d decided to remove the reverb and echo from her vocals resulting in “the vocals slicing through the mix, giving rhythmic contour to the tracks that was previously missing in delay haze”. All in all we can’t wait to her this album.

Walls – “Coracle Remixed” 28th May (Kompakt)

Walls’ “Coracle” 2011 album is treated to remixes from Holy Other, Perc, VOIGT&VOIGT (Wolfgang and Reinhard Voigt) and Jon Tejada among others. Holy Other’s take on ‘Sunporch’ warps Walls’ sound to fit his own trademark formula. It’s a doomy and sluggish affair with ominous slabs of reverbed snare and chords under a shifting guitar line. Hard-edged techno producer Perc’s remix of the same track features a punishing snare drum, squelching mids and echoing screams, twisting the original’s beauty into a mechanistic thump.

“I don’t like things that are too obvious…If you, as a listener, are always putting something in a certain cupboard, I’ve never liked that. If you say, this is jazz, this is pop, this is…experimental techno and all these kinds of things, I don’t like that. I want to make it that somebody can create his own language… That’s what I tried to do. I’ve always tried to do new tracks, sounds that you don’t know, that you can’t define.” Moritz von Oswald, The Wire, July 2009.

Berlin-based producers Mark Ernestus and Moritz von Oswald established Basic Channel in 1993. Building on the techno dialogue between Detroit and Berlin in the early nineties and the duo developed a slender but adored catalogue of stripped, ultra-minimal releases that compacted together techno, dub and ambient. Besides Basic Channel, the pair also operated under the ambient-leaning label Chain Reaction and other numerous projects: Cyrus, Phylyps, Quadrant, Maurizio and Rhythm And Sound.

This month’s Classics Critiqued covers “BCD”, a collection of their seminal 12” vinyl records. I have picked “BCD” because, as well as been a personal favourite, its tracks have been incredibly influential on this current generation of techno DJs and producers and without Basic Channel’s existence the genre’s landscape would be very different yet they and their releases are seldom covered in mainstream music press.

Germany’s techno scene was conceived while the country began to redefine itself in 1990.  With Detroit techno serving as their main influence and Berlin as the natural capital, Germany’s youth built their first dance music scene. The no-man’s land that sandwiched the Wall still remained after its collapse, leaving many buildings uninhabited during the year-long reunification process; as such the unclaimed and derelict spaces served many with the opportunity for club locations. Dimitri Hegemann and his Interfisch label peers found a series of underground rooms in the redundant Wertheim Kaufhaus (once Europe’s largest department store), on the Potsdamer Platz artery. The group took on their newly discovered space and named it Tresor (vault or safe in German). Hegemann recalls in Dan Sicko’s expert book ‘Techno Rebels’: “We were the place where East and West kids came together, musically…” Tresor was vastly important in bringing together the once divided generation and became one of a number of clubs in Berlin that introduced thousands to techno and united people through it. Also at the heart of the capital’s techno scene is the Basic Channel-linked record shop and distributor Hard Wax. Co-owned by Ernestus, Hard Wax had and still retains a high regard for Detroit techno and its principles and was central to the explosion of the genre in Berlin.

Rather than being culturally significant in the way that Tresor was, for example, Basic Channel’s value is in their influence on techno’s sound, aesthetics and preference for anonymity; that “let the music do the talking” mantra. As with Drexciya and Detroit’s Underground Resistance, Basic Channel infused techno with the mythology that would become as fundamental to the genre as its steady bass drum. Rarely permitting press coverage and by choosing a purely functional and unyielding name, Moritz von Oswald and Mark Ernestus divorced themselves from the outside world with a self-contained production and distribution house that included their studio, label, Dubplates & Mastering facility and Ernestus’ Hard Wax. As with some techno artists, Basic Channel can be an alienating experience for those uninitiated in the genre and near impossible for a casual listener to penetrate; record sleeves contained little information but for a Berlin fax number and a sticker instructing “buy vinyl”. The cryptically named tracks, murky and populated by machines churning and throbbing, have little humanness or apparent emotional content.

Throughout the first half of the nineties, Basic Channel were one of Europe’s first techno innovators. Ernestus and von Oswald defined dance minimalism early on, both through a love of repetition as a form of change and a desire to let the music speak for itself. The tracks, released on their eponymous label, were termed ‘dub-techno’, owing to the subtraction of all but the genre’s most essential ingredients, which were then reconstructed to merge Jamaican dub, 4/4 bass drum pulses and dissonant synthesisers swallowed by rippling delays and reverb. They restrained techno’s energy to untethered pulses and glancing synths that churn and wash below a surface of fog and crackle; ‘murky’ is a signature adjective. As respected electronic music journalist Philip Sherburne wrote, the pair were making “music of horizontal energies, sinking in and spreading out.”

Their pioneering catalogue has informed the work of Monolake (Robert Henke is an alumnus of Dubplates & Mastering), Drexciya, (another duo who until recently have been unfairly ignored by music press) Hard Wax and D&M associate Pole and Plastikman, who, alongside Basic Channel, form an important family from which minimal techno was born. Later Vladislav Delay, Thomas Brinkmann, Beat Pharmacy, Echospace and DeepChord incorporated the moist grooves of their music into different templates. Their aesthetics can be traced in labels such as Ostgut, Delsin, Stroboscopic Artefacts, CRS Recordings and Perc Trax, while contemporary DJs and producers Marcel Dettmann, Ben Klock, Voices From The Lake, Skudge, Morphosis, and the mammoth Berlin techno club Berghain are closely related to this renaissance in the duo’s catalogue.

Basic Channel have become a synonym for vaporous dub-techno and their legacy is such that they are consistently referenced in press releases and artist descriptions within electronic music magazines yet journalists rarely explore their career or catalogue. A search through the archives of FACT, xlr8r, Resident Advisor, Pitchfork and The Wire will reveal hundreds of references to Basic Channel though disappointingly only a couple of articles written about them. Ernestus and von Oswald built a body of work that needs to be investigated. They were instrumental in the creation of a new culture in techno and theirs is a 20 year heritage whose influence can be heard in hundreds of artists. They are widely acknowledged to have perfected the dub-techno sound and without them techno would be a markedly different genre.

Mark Ernestus and Moritz von Oswald have grown into the genre’s figureheads and “BCD” is an essential synopsis of one of the most important names in all of techno. As von Oswald stated in his interview for The Wire, “It’s not about status, It’s not about legacy; it’s about listening.”

Vier

Spotify playlist:

Various Artists – BCD

or if you don’t have Spotify listen to three minute previews at Hard Wax’s website.

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